Ending 15-Minute Care

7 October 2013

Our new research reveals that the public overwhelming oppose 15-minute care visits, while some local authorities are delivering more than three-quarters of their care in 15 minutes.

Our research into the public's views used a ComRes poll of 2,025 British adults conducted between 6 and 8 September 2013. In addition, we used Freedom of Information requests to find out how local authorities are using 15-minute care visits.

Key findings

  • 60% of local authorities now commission 15-minute visits (based on 63 authorities that were able to tell us how many 15-minute visits they delivered).
  • The proportion of visits which lasted 15 minutes or less has risen by 15% over the past five years.
  • Some local authorities deliver more than three-quarters of their care visits in 15 minutes.
  • 15% of councils deliver more than a quarter of all of their care visits to disabled and older people in 15 minutes or less.
  • 96% of those who expressed an opinion agree that disabled or older people have the right to receive social care visits that allow for enough time for care workers to give the appropriate support to do everyday things.
  • Of those who expressed an opinion, 93% of people agree that a 15-minute visit is not long enough to support a disabled or older person to do everyday things like wash, dress and get out of bed in the morning.
  • Of those who expressed an opinion, 78% agree that 15-minute care visits deprive disabled and older people of their dignity.
  • Of those who expressed an opinion, 67% of people disagree that 15-minute care visits are an effective way of providing social care to a great number of disabled or older people. (ComRes polling of 2,025 British adults, conducted between 6 and 8 September 2013. Data were weighted to be representative of all adults aged 18+. For each statement, the base does not include people who selected “Don’t know”.)